Nutrition
Reviewed by

Shifa Fathima

Healthy Eating Plan for Diabetes

People with diabetes have to be careful when it comes to eating habits. Diabetes is when your body cannot produce enough insulin or is unable to utilize the released insulin in the body to manage blood sugar levels

Since every food that we eat contains some amount of sugar, it becomes extremely necessary to form a healthy diet plan which will enable you to enjoy your favorite foods while remaining safe. It's a no-brainer that people with diabetes should avoid all sorts of junk foods and starchy vegetables. Instead, their diet should be filled with whole grains, proteins and healthy fats and carbs should be avoided at all costs. A sugar patient food diet should be made with the help of a nutritionist and a doctor so as to not face any problems later on. A lot of the diabetic condition can be managed by eating right and adopting a healthy lifestyle. 

Developing a Healthy-Eating Plan

There are various benefits of following a healthy meal plan, especially for people with diabetes. A healthy diet plan for diabetics includes a balanced meal in proportion. Each of the five food groups—complex carbs, protein, fat, vitamins and minerals, and water—should be included in the meal you design. Better health for you and your family will be ensured by preparing a meal that is rich in all these sources. 

Healthy eating has multiple benefits like weight loss, maintaining a healthy body, stress reduction, alleviation of serious diseases like diabetes, cardiovascular issues, obesity, etc. People with diabetes need to be extra careful about their health and the kind of foods they consume. A healthy eating plan assists majorly in managing and controlling diabetes and diabetes related diseases. 

Foods To Eat vs Foods To Avoid

There are certain foods that people with diabetes should eat and certain foods that should be completely cut out of their diets. Let's take a look at which is which. 

Foods To Eat

Carbohydrates elevate blood sugar levels more quickly than proteins or lipids. They also have the greatest impact on your blood sugar levels. Fiber, protein, and fat may help to reduce blood sugar spikes after meals. So strive for diversity. Eat a variety of carbs, protein, and fat to help you regulate your blood sugar and feel fuller for longer. However, choose excellent carbs and sensible fats that are:

  • Fiber-rich foods include vegetables, fruits, nuts, beans, peas, and whole grains.
  • Fish that are good for your heart, such as salmon and tuna
  • Vegetables, legumes, whole grains, and fruit are examples of healthy carbohydrates.
  • Fish, nuts and seeds, avocado, olives, extra virgin olive oil, and canola oil are all good sources of healthy fats.

After meals, check your blood sugar. Examine the relationship between what you eat and drink and your blood sugar levels afterwards. You should also keep note of how many grams or servings of carbs you consume with each meal and attempt to keep it consistent from meal to meal. This may also assist you in taking control of your blood sugar.

Foods To Avoid

Saturated Fat: Saturated fat elevates blood cholesterol levels. It may be found in high-fat animal protein such as bacon and sausage, as well as high-fat dairy such as butter, full-fat cheese, and ice cream, as well as coconut oil and chicken skin.

Trans fats, often known as hydrogenated or partly hydrogenated oil, are liquid oils that solidify. Trans fats are found in ingredients such as stick margarine and shortening, as well as processed meals such as certain chips, cookies, and fast restaurant French fries.

Cholesterol: Your cholesterol level is made up of both natural cholesterol in your blood and cholesterol from diet. Keep an eye out for high-fat dairy and animal products, as well as egg yolks, liver, and other organ meats.

Sodium: Don't forget to keep an eye on your salt intake as well. That is an aspect of a diabetes-friendly diet. Eating less salt has been demonstrated to aid in the prevention and treatment of high blood pressure. Read labels and pick foods with reduced salt levels. Learn more about food label reading and supermarket shopping with diabetes.

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Sample Day Menu with Calories

Breakfast

High fiber carbs like whole grain cereal, bread, muffin, bagel

Lean protein like eggs, low fat milk, skim milk and cheese or yogurt

Healthy fats like avocado, nuts, yogurt parfait

Use extra virgin olive oil or canola oil

Lunch

A sandwich or a wrap with whole grain bread, roasted turkey, skinless chicken, pork, tuna

Skim milk cheese or soy cheese, hummus or bean stew

Salad made with dark green lettuce, veggies, one lean meat and dressing 

Dinner

High fiber carbs such as cooked grains, quinoa, barley, amaranth

Vegetables with whole wheat bread, dark green lettuce or fruit

Grilled or baked fish, either alone or in a mixed meal like tacos

Skinless chicken, grilled, roasted, or stir-fried

Entrees using skim-milk cheese, such as eggplant parmesan, vegetarian pizza with whole wheat crust, veggie lasagna, or enchiladas

Bottomline

Diabetes is when your body cannot produce enough insulin or is unable to utilize the released insulin in the body to manage blood sugar levels. People with diabetes need to be extra careful about their health and the kind of foods they consume. A healthy eating plan assists majorly in managing and controlling diabetes and diabetes related diseases. There are foods that people with diabetes should eat and foods they should avoid. Carbohydrates elevate blood sugar levels more quickly than proteins or lipids.

Eat a variety of carbs, protein, and fat to help regulate your blood sugar and feel fuller for longer. Examine the relationship between what you eat and drink and your blood sugar levels afterwards. Keep an eye out for high-fat dairy and animal products, as well as egg yolks, liver, and other organ meats. Read labels and pick foods with reduced salt levels.

FAQs

What Is A Healthy Diet For Diabetes?

Eating the correct foods for diabetes entails consuming a wide range of healthful foods from all food groups: Vegetables and fruits Whole wheat, brown rice, barley, quinoa, and oats are examples of whole grains. Lean meats, chicken, turkey, fish, eggs, nuts, beans, lentils, and tofu are all good sources of protein.

What Foods Can Diabetics Eat Freely?

The key to eating well with diabetes is to consume a variety of healthful meals from all food categories in the proportions recommended by your meal plan.

The food groups are

  1. Veggies : Broccoli, carrots, greens, peppers, and tomatoes are examples of non starchy vegetables.
  2. Fruits including oranges, melon, berries, apples, bananas, and grapes starchy: contains potatoes, corn, and green peas
  3. Whole Grains : Oats, cornmeal, barley, and quinoa—at least half of your grains for the day should be whole grains.
  4. Protein sources include lean meat (chicken or turkey without the skin), fish, eggs, almonds, and peanuts and meat replacements such as tofu and yogurt

What Foods Reduce Diabetes Fast?

There are certain foods that aid in the management of diabetes and help reduce the blood sugar levels in the body. They are beneficial for people with diabetes and here’s the lost of foods that reduce diabetes fast:

  • Broccoli and broccoli sprouts
  • Seafood 
  • Pumpkin and pumpkin seeds
  • Nuts and berries
  • Okra and kale
  • Flax seeds and chia seeds
  • Lentils and beans

What Snacks Don't Raise Blood Sugar?

There are various snacks that people with diabetes can enjoy without putting their health at risk. Just because you have diabetes does not mean that you cannot eat food that’s tasty. Portion control is the key. Here are a few things that you can snack on guilt free:

  • Apples
  • Hummus
  • Nuts
  • Peanut butter in small quantities
  • Trail mix
  • Eggs
  • Yogurt 
  • Popcorn

References

  • https://www.webmd.com/diabetes/diabetes-meal-plan

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